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Michael Adamson

A Private Collection of Large Paintings
2004 - 2012

On Until December 31, 2017

"Abstract painting, is actually the most straightforward type of painting. There's no illusion,
there's no picture of a thing. It's the most rudimentary way to make art. And yet it's a form that
makes a large amount of people nervous." Michael Adamson, 2011
 
Over the last year, Earls Court Gallery has been presenting bimonthly Online Art Exhibitions via
our online store (www.earlscourtart.com). It is with great pleasure that we launch into our
second year of this virtual endeavor with a selection of Michael Adamson paintings from a
private collection, dating from 2004-2012.

An online exhibition and Adamson’s large scale paintings are the perfect combination and
method of sharing his ideas as it reinforces what he has aimed to accomplish for most of his
artistic career; challenging society’s expectations of art and artists, question what constitutes
art, and dismantling barriers on where art can LIVE and THRIVE.

Now a senior career artist, Adamson began his studies in 1992 at Emily Carr Institute of Art and
Design. Exhibiting his paintings immediately after, Adamson’s vibrant abstracts became sought
after in one of Canada’s central art hubs, Toronto. Adamson began to exhibit regularly at Moore
gallery, and further expanding to such galleries as McMichael Canadian Art Collection,
Kleinberg; Michael Gibson Gallery, London; along with many international venues. Furthermore,
if you visit Adamson’s personal website, you will see he is not shy about highlight his artwork in
the home. The home is the personal gallery and having art in the home reflection of personality
of the individual in an expressive way. The home adds further context to Adamson’s paintings
and gives them deeper meaning than any formal and stale institutional space could.

It is the intention of this online exhibition that as you view them, your screen becomes your own
private gallery. The office, home, or bus you are riding on is virtually splashed with colour and
you know that art can LIVE and THRIVE everywhere!

— Andrea Jackman, Curator